People

Candolin Cook is a PhD student at the University of New Mexico specializing in the history of the American West–especially the Southwest, Western Myth and popular culture, Native history, and antiquities. She also works on her partner’s organic produce farm in Albuquerque, and enjoys local food, old music, and good film.​

Sharon Karpinski: Born too long ago. Grew up in New Mexico and Illinois. Dropped out of college in the ‘60s, went back in 1999, got my BA in University Studies at UNM in 2001, Master’s in American Western History in 2008(?), HPR Certificate after that. Between my first college experience and my last, I was a wife, mother, astrologer’s assistant, topless wrestler, real estate broker, writer…. long, strange trip. I’m particularly interested in environmental, agricultural, and food history but I’m easily amused, which means I can be sidetracked into almost any area in the discipline. Remaining focused is hard.

Kylie Manning is a graduate student at the University of New Mexico currently working on an MA in US History and a MA certificate in Museum Studies. She works as Dance School Manager and Volunteer Coordinator at Keshet Dance Company, a non-profit contemporary dance company in Albuquerque since 1996. She is an avid reader of historical fiction and her favorite food is lime fruit.

Jairo Mars

Gianna May is a first year Master’s student with the History Department, studying 20th century U.S. West with a focus in women and gender history. She is currently interested in and researching professional and traditional medicine in the Southwest and its interaction across categories of race, class, and gender. She is also interested in public history and video games as a medium to present and teach history.

Guy McClellan is a PhD student in UNM’s history program. He studies the modern American West, with a particular interest in urban, environmental, and spatial history.

Kaveh Mowahed:   I am a graduate student, a docent, a volunteer, and a laborer. I wear many hats and I am informed by all of them. My goal is to survive comfortably while contributing to my community’s education and wellbeing.

Eric Payseur is the AHA-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for Career Diversity and the History PhD at UNM. During and following his PhD, he was an active urban agriculture director and practitioner, and he taught college and university courses on food and sustainability in Ontario, Canada. A trained migration historian, his current project draws equally upon his academic and non-academic experiences to meld food, migration, and environmental history.

Angela Reinich

Virginia Scharff is Associate Provost for Faculty Development and Distinguished Professor of History and Director of the Center for the Southwest at the University of New Mexico. She has published numerous books including Taking the Wheel: Women and the Coming of the Motor Age (1991); Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West (2003), and the edited volume, Seeing Nature Through Gender (2003). Scharff’s most recent book, The Women Jefferson Loved (HarperCollins, 2010) was named a New York Times “Editor’s Choice.” She is also the author of four mystery suspense novels, written under the name of VIRGINIA SWIFT: Brown-Eyed Girl (2000), Bad Company (2002), Bye, Bye, Love (2004), and Hello, Stranger (2006).

Scharff served as co-curator of “Home Lands: How Women Made the West,” (2010) and “Empire and Liberty: The Civil War and the West,” (2015), exhibitions sponsored by the Autry National Center, where she serves as Chair of Western Women’s History. She is a Fellow and Executive Board Member of the Society of American Historians. She was President of the Western History Association for 2008.

 

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